What does half a worm look like

Fishing with worm: tips and tricks for catching the natural bait

Eels, tench, carp, bream, but also perch, chub and alande like to eat a worm. Even pikeperch are not averse to dewworms. Few fish can withstand the stimuli of worm fishing. But which factors make a worm a great bait?

First of all, it is its ringing that draws the fish's attention to the bite. In addition, the worm gives off an attractive smell for the fin bearers, especially if it is cut up or baited in many small pieces. The fish often bite the end of the worm from which the smell emanates.

And finally, the fish know worms from their natural diet, because after heavy rainfall worms are often washed into the water and thus enrich the fish's diet. No wonder that worms catch best in cloudy, churned water.

Image: Blinker / E. Hartwich

All good things come in threes: dewworm, dungworm and dendrobena

Angling with worm - overview:

  1. 5 species of worms to catch
  2. The right bait when fishing with worm
  3. Worms lure enormously - not only on the hook, but also when feeding
  4. Angling with worm - naturally attractant scores when caught
  5. Catch longer with artificial worms
  6. Combine worms, increase catch
  7. Fishing with worm - it's all about the ratio!
  8. Worm hunting

5 species of worms to catch

Laypeople speak of the earthworm that anglers "bathe" when they think of fishing. But not all worms are created equal. And certain types of worms are also better suited to catch some types of fish than others. There are five types of worms:

  1. Dewworm
  2. Earthworm
  3. Giant red worm
  4. Tree worm
  5. Dungworm

1. Thawworm

The largest of the worms is the dew worm. You can find this worm on warm, humid nights on freshly mown lawns or in beds. You illuminate the worm with a head lamp with a red light and grab it behind the head. Now you hold it tight with a slight pull so that the bristly worm end detaches from the earth. If the light of the flashlight is too bright, the worm quickly retreats back into its cave.

On wet summer nights, for example after thunderstorms, up to 100 worms can be collected in this way in less than an hour. Many anglers, especially in metropolitan areas, also buy thawworms from their equipment dealers. These worms - often imported from Canada - are usually available in cans of 10. However, the imports appear to have been treated with preservatives to extend their shelf life.

In comparison with freshly searched for thawworms, the catches with those from the specialist dealer remained significantly behind. That is why the following rule applies to the dewworm: Freshness catches. A can of thawworms now costs around 2.50 euros in specialist shops, which is more than 20 cents per thawworm.

Image: Blinker / E. Hartwich

2. Earth worm

The earthworm has a grayish color that sometimes even has a bluish tinge. It occurs mainly in sandy and loamy soils. Earthworms have a particularly firm skin and therefore hold on to the hook very well. Some anglers therefore value the earthworm more than the dewworm, especially when fishing for eel. Earthworms also work extremely well as bait when fishing for barbel, as well as on barbel.

Image: Blinker / E. Hartwich

3. Giant redworm

The giant redworm, also called Dendrobena, is available in different sizes. It is relatively insensitive to cold and heat, although it should not be stored in the car for hours at temperatures around 30 degrees. Dendrobenas can be bought in any fishing shop. Larger numbers of worms can be obtained from worm farms such as Superworm or Terravita. The Dendrobena is also ideal for feeding.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

4. Tree worm

As the name suggests, tree worms can be found between slightly damp layers of leaves. This type of worm is characterized by its strong red color. The deciduous worm can be used to make the best catches in waters that are surrounded by many deciduous trees.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

5. Dungworm

The dungworm lives in the compost heap. This worm can also be found in pig manure. When baited on the hook, it secretes a strong-smelling, yellow liquid. And this ensures that the dungworm is particularly easy to catch. Especially in winter and spring, dungworms are one of the best baits of all. Small dungworms are also ideal for imitating mosquito larvae.

Image: Blinker / E. Hartwich

The right bait when fishing with worm

Worms can be baited in different ways. We show you eight possibilities:

  1. Head baiting
  2. Through the middle
  3. On the hair
  4. For a quick start
  5. Popped up
  6. shashlik
  7. Catfish braid
  8. Pödder

1. Head baiting

Worms can be baited in different ways. When fishing with worms, beginners often push the terrestrial dweller completely onto the hook and sometimes down to the leader. However, the worm looks so unnatural and crooked. It is much better if you can catch the worm once only sticks through the head. This way the bait looks extremely natural and is better accepted by the fish.

Only drawback: You have to wait a long time for the fish to swallow it. And if only small perch bite, you have to put up with one or the other bad bite. If that is the case, you should divide the worm in half until you hook the fish. Even when actively fishing for large perch, the dewworm is only hooked in the head.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

2. Through the middle

The best way to bait a worm is to pull the hook once through the middle of the ringler. This allows the fish to suck up the worm and then hook it safely. Even fish that start to gnaw at each end of the worm will sooner or later hit the hook. A worm hooked in the middle can be presented extremely naturally. And fish such as perch and pikeperch inhale the worm in a suction movement anyway and then hang securely on the hook.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

 

3. Worm on the hair

A single worm can also be used on the hair: To do this, insert a bait needle into a hook with a hair and a so-called push stop, pierce it through the worm and withdraw the bait needle. The push stop is positioned across and the worm is on the hair. When baited in this way, the worm can even survive long casts.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

This is how the worm gets on your hair:

4. For a quick start

If you are fishing with a worm between obstacles, such as sunken trees or over stone packs, the first attempt must be made as quickly as possible so that the fish cannot retreat into the obstacle. Then you pull a rope worm head onto the hook and let the tip of the hook peek out from below. So you can strike as soon as the pose or electronic bite indicator signal that the bait has been picked up. If you react too late, the fish has often already settled and can no longer be released from the obstacle. If the tip of the hook sticks out from the bottom of the worm, you have to react extremely quickly.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

5. Popped up

Worms can hide in soft muddy floors relatively quickly and easily. Under such conditions, it is therefore easy to find them. This works best with a piece of colored foam that you slide onto the hook with the worms.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

6. Shish kebab

If you want to bring as much smell as possible into the water, use a worm kebab. To do this, a worm is cut into pieces that are as small as possible and no more than two centimeters long. These are then lured like pieces of kebab on top of each other on the hook. A lot of worm juice escapes at the cut ends, which spreads a wide scent trail in the water. An ideal way to quickly draw the fish's attention to the bait.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

7. Catfish braid

For catfish you need larger bait when fishing with worms, in the form of a whole bundle of rope worms, a so-called catfish pigtail. The worms are pulled onto a system of single hooks and triple hooks that hang underneath and snake seductively in the water like the head of Medusa with a snake.

But it is a fallacy to believe that the catfish simply inhales the entire bundle of worms. Rather, even large catfish often only pluck very gently at one or two worms.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

8. Pödder

You don't need a hook for eel fishing with the bait. To tie a pödder, up to 20 rope worms are pulled lengthways onto a strong woolen thread with a bait needle. Then you wrap the worm chain around your hand and knot the ends of the wool thread over the worms.

Next, you tie the bundle of worms under a specially shaped podder lead. The eels bite into the bundle of rope worms and stick with their teeth on the fine wool fibers. You lift the fish on a podder stick and shake it off over a depression or a small children's paddling pool.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

Worms lure enormously - not only on the hook, but also when feeding

Chopped up worms are one of the best fish attractants ever. But so that the worms are ready for use, you first have to prepare them: To do this, you put them on a grub strainer and clean them from clumps of earth and small roots in the water.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

The scissors with the three blades are available in fishing supplies for pole anglers.

Coarse fish professionals then cut either dendrobenas or thawworms with triple scissors into pieces of worm about two centimeters long. They use them pure or enrich them with pupated maggots, also known as casters. This concentrated lock mixture is either applied with the pole cup on the uninged pole.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

Precise feeding of the worm pieces works best with the pole cup.

Or you can offer the worm-caster mix with the feeder by placing it between two food stoppers. This type of feeding is called sandwich feeding because the worm load is spread between the two plugs of food like the topping between two halves of bread rolls.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

This is how the "feed sandwich" is created: Put the feed plug in the basket, fill it with worms and secure it with a second plug from above.

Angling with worms - naturally attractant scores when caught

To make bait even more catchy, there are liquid worm extract from various companies that you can either add to the feed or pour over the cut worms. This is how the Worm scent even increased. Especially bream and tench, but also perch, are magically attracted by such a "stink bomb". Even at temperatures around freezing point, especially in early spring, the worms in the feed basket can usually still catch some fish if powder feed fails.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

Numerous attractants are available in stores, which can be mixed directly over the worm pieces or into the feed.

Catch longer with artificial worms

Artificial worms are now also being offered on the market. These range from Berkley Gulp worms ("Earthworms" are particularly recommended) to those of the Hungarian company Energofish (distributor Ernö Rötter). The artificial worms are mainly used where many small fish quickly pluck a real worm off the hook. The artificial worms, on the other hand, withstand the attacks of the little pests.

In addition, the artificial worms hold firmly on the hook, so you never have to fear that they will fall off when you throw them. Soft plastic worms can also be used when fishing with modern spin fishing rigs such as the Dropshot, Texas or Carolina rig.

Image: Blinker / W.Krause

There are also worms made of soft plastic. They last longer on the hook.

Combine worms, increase catch